The Day in the Life of Amar

            As technology is developing so rapidly now a days, members of first world countries and the privileged tend to take their lifestyles for granted and find ways to ease our situations with the least amount of work.  The short documentary Amar (All Great Achievement Require Time), beautifully illustrates the life of a boy who was not born into such privilege but shows passion and determination to break his current situation. 

            The director, Andrew Hilton, saw the drive in the teenager and captured a day in the life of Amar using an observational style documentary.  This was a very wise decision since Amar’s actions do not need explanation as to why they should be admired.  Using the strategies of the purest of observational documentaries, Hilton choice not to include music, interviews, or narration of any kind.  I believe this aided to Amar’s authenticity since we, as viewers are able to watch and draw our own conclusions about his life with any influence.  The filming’s affect is very personal and intimate without being intrusive to the characters.  Hilton’s camera work is done so well that it gives me a feeling like the camera isn’t even there.

            Beyond this Hilton’s scene selections is expertly weaves twenty hours of Amar’s life into a nine-minute clip.  Cutting down twenty hours into nine minutes of footage would be very difficult, but is done so smoothly that the viewer never feels like they are even missing out on anything.  There is never any moment where we not caught up in his hustling life.  It definitely improves the affect of drive and perseverance in the film since he has no down time besides eating with his family, and even then he is in assistance.   While I have never met Amar and have never heard anything about him before this clip, after watching it I feel very close to him and can feel his struggle and ambition.  This is definitely one of the most powerful short documentaries I have ever seen.

 

Question: The observational style used in this documentary is very effective in its affective purposes.  How could I possibility use this to help me create my desired affect?

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