Keep It Simple

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Made Together says let’s kick it off right: bright (but not annoying) colors, large font, clear header navigation, but simple.  I’m hooked.  What is this website all about?

Like most company websites, Made Together gears their page toward potential customers.  Clearly every company website with that aim wants their page to be well designed, but for Made Together, I think the styling of their website is crucial.  After all, what’s a better way to sell their designing skills than by proving their adeptness with a well-designed website?

Scrolling down from the initial screen, the bright blue nicely transitions to a white that’s a little easier on the eyes.  Now that they have captured their audience, they can tone it down a bit.

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So what is their featured work?  They don’t tell us, they show us.  They have a few pictures capturing some of their top projects—a very appropriate considering that Made Together specializes in design.  But maybe you want a little more information than what the picture shows.  Maybe you accidentally move your mouse across the screen, and—surprise!  The pictures are links.

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At the bottom of the page we have a new color informing us that we have reached the footer.

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The black provides a nice contrast and stands out, but like the blue, it isn’t annoying; it’s tasteful.  Black and white is almost always a good match.

Made Together mainly caught my eye because of its simplicity.  It accomplishes so much but has a fantastically minimalist design.  I don’t feel overwhelmed with or daunted by the amount of information on my screen, but the bright colors, large font, and bold pictures still intrigue me and make me want to keep looking.  But they let me pick what I want to explore further.  The pictures of their projects are a great example of how they structure their whole website: if you care about it, you can click the link they provide.  Otherwise, who cares?  They don’t force you to scroll through information you don’t want to see.

In this age of short attention spans, I think that the skill of being able to say a lot with a little is crucial.  People want information fast, and they don’t always care about the details.  Made Together provides the important facts on their homepage: who they are, what their projects look like, and how to contact them.  They provide further details via links for those interested in exploring, but understand that it’s not necessary to have it all on the first page.

Question: When it is more appropriate to have a lot of information as opposed to a little?

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