Spooky reps for the new school

“Rhythm science isn’t just about sound, of course.  Imagery, whether presented on canvas or seen as a series of repeated photographic, cinematic, televisual, or digitized stills has a way of evoking a “kinedramatic” imaginal response. Sometimes the images carve out a blank space that memory later gives meaning to.  At other moments, they have an immediate, visceral effect.  Angles of incidence leave paths of thought unresolved, a high-resolution photo from-capture, still life, nature-morte.  The technologies of rhythm science are an extension of what had long been going on.  Computer interfaces reify earlier formal and structural orientations.  Think about how John Cage used to just stare at the piano in his silence pieces.  The instrument was a jumping off point – an interface that had so many routes available.  Cage wanted to highlight that meditational aspect of the creative act.  The technologies of rhythm science are conduits for the same impulses.  The simultaneity of such a variety of source materials and media distinguishes digital composition from its analog predecessors, not to mention the actual physical “dematerialization.” In other words, rhythm scientists don’t need orchestras; they can simulate them just fine, thanks.  It’s not so much that the technology changes the compositional process, as extends it into new realms.”

I think this paragraph is important because it introduces a side of archiving which we have not yet discussed: the actual creative process, beyond inspiration.  Up until this point both Spooky and our class discussions have viewed the process of archiving as a science.  One must simply take what was once in the past and reconfigure it to create anew.  As true as this may be, there is still a step within that process that involves personal creativity.

Spooky speaks of imagery evoking an imaginal response.  Regardless of how one interacts with it, the purpose of rhythm science is to produce a feeling for the audience to grasp.  “Sometimes the images carve out a blank space that memory later gives meaning to.  At other moments, they have an immediate, visceral effect.”  As scientific as the process may appear at times, it could be argued that art is still what is being created, and that art will always resonate different to any given audience.

The second piece to this paragraph is the topic of technology and its benefits to rhythm science.  It could be argued that Spooky is simply trying to say that digitized composition only leads to efficiency.  However, the final sentence of the paragraph proves that technology is actually broadening the horizons of composition: “It’s not so much that the technology changes the compositional process, as extends it into new realms.”  This last sentence certainly represents the argument held by the average young creative/artist today.  In being one myself, I think the more complex existing technologies, and that does not only mean the internet, provide a multitude of platforms and tools that now exist in a genre unknown to the world 20 years in the past.

 

Question:  With greater ease of creation, comes greater competition to make a living doing so.  For a specific type of person (creatives) who commonly dislikes the idea of corporations having unnecessary control, how might they feel about selling advertising space being the only way for them to make money doing what they enjoy?

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